NYC Gas Crisis

NY will continue to experience phenomenons left over from “Sandy”. Every person you speak to, the same words are repeated….”I need gas” “Where can I find gas” to name a few.

Over 40 years ago there was a gas shortage, people used to steal, fight and rare occasions commit horrible crimes just for a few gallons of gas. That era is being repeated today bring with it  dark, stressful dreadful vibes.

Who would think in my lifetime I would experience such an ordeal.

But, as New Yorker’s we must do what we have always been doing in times of need. We will band together, we will provide for thy fellow neighbor, we will over come this stagnant energy and triumph over all. NY is the backbone of america and I need not remind you that every country in the world refers to NY as America. We will survive and we will prevail!!!

Hurricane Sandy – True Nursing At It’s Best!

NY have battled many in its history, but none were prepared for this. Hurricane Sandy on 10/29/12 unleashed a fury that ignited fears and courage all over New York. I have witnessed personally the devastation brought upon NY by this natural phenomenon and I have seen the true nature of dedication Nurses have to their community.

Our clients are wide and vast and I must commend the RNs, LPNs and CNAs for banding together in this great time of need. I’ve heard so many stories that I lost count. Stories of nurses abandoning their vehicle in waist-high water to make it to work, nurses working four plus shifts and not willing to leave until the danger is adverted. I’ve even heard about nurses opening their homes (those that weren’t affected much) to comrades for shelter just to make it to work the next day.

Many hospitals were evacuated due to various unforeseen circumstances, but no matter the challenges, the Nursing bond could not be broken. Not one report of failed nursing attempts while evacuating during the torrential down pour, vast flooding and many other constraints thrown at them.

When we say Nurses, the titles are long and wide. From the head – Director of Nursing Services down the ladder to CNAs were all hands on deck.

Today We Salute You…The Nurses Of NYC!!!

Meridian’s Open House Event

Meridian's Open House Event

Refreshments will be served

Can A Nurse Be In Two Places At Once?

THIS NURSE WAS EXPECTED TO PROTECT A PATIENT AND RESPOND TO A CODE.

A 92-year-old woman with heart failure, pulmonary fibrosis, anemia, and other problems came to the emergency department with viral pneumonia. Once her condition stabilized, she was transferred to the cardiac care unit (CCU).

Still in the CCU 2 days later, the patient got out of bed, even though both side rails were up, the footboard was on the bed, and the nurses had warned her to stay in bed. The nurses’ notes indicated that she was confused.

The next day, reports on the patient’s mental status varied. At 8:30 a.m., her physician assessed her and didn’t find her condition serious enough to order restraints. At 12:30 and 2:00 p.m., the nurse documented that the patient thought she was at home. When the nurse checked her at 3:20 p.m., however, she was alert and oriented. Thirty minutes later, she was on the floor. Her right hip was fractured.

The patient underwent an open hip reduction and internal fixation and was discharged 10 days later. Using a walker, she was able to walk with assistance. After three follow-up examinations, the fracture had healed and the patient didn’t have pain.

Seven months after her admission to the hospital, the patient was readmitted for numerous disorders, including sepsis, renal failure, and acute pulmonary edema. She died 9 days later. Her children sued the hospital, the physician, and the nurse for negligence regarding their mother’s fall.

In court, the testimony revealed that the nurse had been assigned exclusively to this patient. However, after she had checked the patient at 3:20 p.m., a code was called on another patient. Hospital policy also required her to respond to the code, so she left her patient for 30 minutes.

A jury found in favor of the plaintiffs and awarded them $555,000 in damages. Although the defendants appealed, the appeals court upheld the decision but reduced the amount to $500,000.

The lesson? Nurses are vulnerable even when they follow the rules. By adhering to the facility’s policy, this nurse was drawn into a no-win situation.

 

Credits: This article was referenced from http://www.nso.com/nursing-resources/article/25.jsp

NYS Nursing

Nursing

There are three distinct licenses within the nursing profession in New York State: Registered Professional Nurse, Licensed Practical Nurse and Nurse Practitioner.

A Registered Professional Nurse (RN) may:

diagnose and treat a patient’s unique responses to diagnosed health problems;

perform health assessments to identify new symptoms of possibly undiagnosed conditions or complications

teach and counsel patients about maintenance of health and prevention of illness or complications;

execute medical regimens as prescribed by licensed physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and podiatrists, and,

contribute as members of an interdisciplinary health care team and as consultants on health related committees to plan and implement the health care needs of consumers.

A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) provides skilled nursing care tasks and procedures under the direction of an RN, physician, or other authorized health care provider.

A Nurse Practitioner (NP) is an RN who has earned a separate license as an NP through additional education and experience in a distinct specialty area of practice. Nurse practitioners may diagnose, treat, and prescribe for a patient’s condition that falls within their specialty area of practice. This is done in collaboration with a licensed physician qualified in the specialty involved and in accordance with an approved written practice agreement and protocols. Nurse Practitioners are autonomous and do not practice under the supervision of the collaborating physician. (Nurse practitioner specialty areas: Acute Care; Adult Health; College Health; Community Health; Family Health; Gerontology; Holistic Nursing; Neonatology; Obstetrics and Gynecology; Oncology; Palliative Care; Pediatrics; Perinatology; Psychiatry; School Health; Women’s Health)

Read more about the nursing profession.

via NYS Nursing.

Determining quality of health care from York-area hospitals’ performance – York Dispatch

Be it clothing or cars, potential buyers usually have an idea of how good products are and how much they cost before they buy them.

Then they buy what’s believed to be the best quality product for the best possible price.

Determining quality of health care from York-area hospitals’ performance – York Dispatch.

Top 10 Health Care Reform Jokes – Best Political Jokes About Health Reform

Top 10 Health Care Reform Jokes – Best Political Jokes About Health Reform.

Meridian Nurse Launches its New Website

Now improved and with easy user interface, Meridian Nurse launches its new website that features easy online application and file uploading. Come check us out! We are definitely making many ways to talk to our clients — YOU!

http://www.meridiannurse.com