New Rules

Are you up-to-date on the new rules? All RNs have a decade to get their B.S. in Nursing if they don’t have one yet. Many are going back to school now! http://www.nj.com/education/2013/12/new_rules_require_veteran_nurs.html

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Looking for a job?

Looking for a job? At Meridian Nurse Recruiters – we’re looking for you! We have jobs for Rns, RN Supervisors, Executive/Administrative Rns, LPNs, MDS Coordinators, Nurse Educators, Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, PTA and COTA, Speech Therapists, Orderlies, Private Nurses, Rehab Aids and other healthcare positions. Apply today! http://www.meridiannurse.com/jobs.php

New Graduates – Heed My Advice

Remember when we were all children and our aunts and uncles and grandparents would all ask us, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Most of the adults followed the question with an ambiguous statement: “You can be anything you want to be.” This is not entirely false, but to a child, this statement sounds like there’s some magic occupation wand that you stand in front of when you’re older; declare you want to be a superhero, and then POOF! You’re a crime fighting cyborg impervious to bullets and rockets.

 

Maybe my ambitions as a child were somewhat different from yours, but the point here is that when we’re told we can be whatever we want to be, the adults conveniently leave out all it takes to achieve our goals, all the hard work involved, and the fact that as we mature, our personalities may lead to different roads in the career path. Very few can say they followed their ambitions as a child and became what we told adults we wanted to be.

 

I’ll spoil my story for you; I’m not a crime fighting cyborg.

 

But, you’ve made it this far, completed all the educational requirements, got your degree and now you’re faced with another challenge: the job interview. YIKES!

 

It can be tough to predict the questions you’ll hear during the job interview, but in the healthcare field, there are a lot of likely questions that are typically geared towards new graduates you can prepare yourself for.

 

  1. Landing the job interview.

Frequently, new graduates experience tremendous difficulty in even being considered for a job. When facilities obtain your resume, they quickly recognize that you’re a new graduate and they’ll put your resume to the side in favor of someone who has experience. It’s prudent to make yourself known on a more proactive level, and maintain persistency. On a weekly basis, plan a route to visit facilities in person to drop off your resume instead of emailing it. Ask the receptionist who you need to speak with at the facility to discuss employment opportunities, and if that person is unavailable, revisit the facility the following week and ask to speak with that person again. You’ll be turned away quite often, but don’t be discouraged; eventually the right people will take notice of your persistency.

 

  1. Facility concerns.

The bottom line is: all facilities are worried about longevity. How long will they be able to retain you as an employee? Usually, healthcare facilities are not open to the idea of accepted a new graduate because of concern about spending valuable resources to train personnel that may result in wasted effort once you’ve been exposed to the true nature of the job and decide that this isn’t what you had expected. Make it known in your interview that you have a ‘never quit’ attitude, that you’re eager to fulfill the employers’ expectations of a model employee, and that you can easily adapt to changes in your environment.

 

  1. What made you decide to pursue healthcare?

This is a question commonly asked, and the most common answer is: “I like helping people.” While this isn’t the wrong answer, there’s probably a better one, or at least a more euphemistic one. As a new graduate, there are hundreds of others with the same credentials giving the same answer for the same position. What makes you stand out? Dig down and find out what really made you want this particular career. There’s something unique to you personally that encouraged this endeavor. Tell the story in as much detail as possible.

 

  1. What do you know about the facility?

Any employer is always impressed when the interviewees knows a bit about the company. Do your homework. Find out how long the facility has been open for, how many beds there are, how many units, and the track record of the facility during state reviews.

 

  1. Educational background.

This isn’t necessarily something that you should spend too much time on, but it’s important to discuss what challenges you experienced in school, and the steps you took to overcome these challenges. This will show your discipline, something every employer wants to see.

 

  1. Make yourself available.

Healthcare is a 24 hour job, and if you lay down the law and limit what shifts you’ll be willing to work, the facility will have no interest in you. At the same time, you don’t want to appear too desperate by telling them you’re available “whenever”. Tell them your preferences, but make it known that you’re anxious to take on the challenges of any hour and that you’re in an ideal position personally to offer flexibility with scheduling.

 

 

The first job you’re offered may not be exactly what you had in mind when you started going to school, but the most important aspect of your professional profile that you’re currently missing is experience. By all means, you shouldn’t jump at the first opportunity either. Make sure you feel comfortable with what you’ve already been exposed to with the facility. Once you’ve gained at least a year of experience, many doors will open up to you and you’ll be well on your way towards following the career path you initially had in mind.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jesse Rose

We are Staffing for Hospitals

Hospital openings for Occupational Therapists and Certified Occupational Therapists…Qualified Candidates will have an opportunity to work with a reputable hospital, while enhancing their career. Pay is very competitive and the possibilities are endless.
Click here to apply http://meridiannurse.com/online.php

Multiple Positions to be filled

We are currently accepting applicants for multiple positions in Westchester
– Food Service Manager
– Director of Social Service & Marketing
– MDS Coordinator
– Finance Controller
– Admissions Coordinator

Click to apply http://meridiannurse.com/online.php

 

Meridian’s Open House Event

Meridian's Open House Event

Refreshments will be served

Non-Immigrant Visa Options for Nurses – guerreroyee.com

In this post, other avenues for sponsorship are explored.

NIV Options for Nurses — Atty. Rio Guerrero

Since the H-1C nonimmigrant visa program sunset on December 20, 2009, visas for hundreds of nurses have expired or will soon expire, leaving H-1C-authorized healthcare employers struggling to provide much-needed professional nursing care with a dwindling nursing staff. Although H.R. 1933, which is currently pending before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, would reauthorize the H-1C nonimmigrant visa program, the sunset of this program casts light upon the dearth of nonimmigrant visa options available for foreign nurses and its negative impact upon nurse staffing nationwide. What are the alternatives for healthcare facilities in the United States?

Currently Available Nonimmigrant Visa Options for Nurses

TN Status—NAFTA
Registered nurses are included in the list of professions eligible for TN status pursuant to Appendix 1603.D.1 to Annex 1603 of NAFTA.
It is difficult to accurately measure the precise number of Canadian and Mexican citizens currently employed as professional nurses in TN status, however, TN status is generally believed to be the most frequently utilized nonimmigrant option among foreign nurses employed in the United States. The primary advantage of TN status is the ease of entry. Registered nurses applying for admission in TN status may be employed in positions covering a wide scope of expertise – from entry-level RN placements to more senior administrative positions. However, the stark disadvantage of TN status is that the pool of potential foreign nurses is restricted to Canadian and Mexican citizens.

H-1B Specialty Occupation Workers
It is well-settled that certain specialty occupations in the nursing industry may qualify for H-1B  nonimmigrant status. Specifically, a narrow group of nurses holding a baccalaureate or higher degree (or equivalency) in nursing that includes advanced practice nurses (such as Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS), Nurse Practitioners (NP), Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA), and Certified Nurse-Midwives (CNM)), nurse managers, and nursing administrators, may qualify for H-1B status. According to USCIS data, the issuance of H-1B visas for specialty occupation nurses varies greatly from year to year. In recent history, the greatest number of H-1B nurse visas issued in any given fiscal year was only 136. Unlike TN status, the H-1B visa for specialty occupation nurses is available to qualified nurses from all foreign countries. However, the limited scope of eligible specialty occupations greatly narrows the potential use of the H-1B to fill U.S. nursing job vacancies. For instance, many RNs may not qualify for an H-1B because employers and state licensing boards do not usually require a BSN to perform services as a registered nurse.

Return of the H-1C?
The H-1C nonimmigrant classification enables foreign nurses to perform services as a registered
nurse in a U.S. health professional shortage area as determined by the U.S. Department of Labor
(DOL). To qualify for an H-1C visa, both the employer and employee must meet certain
eligibility criteria. The U.S. employer must:
-Be a “subsection (d)” hospital under the Social Security Act;
-Be located in a “Health Professional Shortage Area;”
– Have at least 190 acute care beds;
-Have a Medicare population of no less than 35%;
– Have a Medicaid population of no less than 28%; and
-Be certified by DOL.

The employee must:
-Hold a full and unrestricted nursing license in the country where their nursing education was obtained, or have received a nursing education in the U.S.;
-Have passed the examination administered by the Commission on Graduates for Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS), or have a full and unrestricted license to practice as a registered nurse in the state where the employee will work, or have a full and unrestricted registered nurse’s license in any state and have received temporary authorization to practice as a registered nurse in the state where the employee will work; and
-Have been fully qualified and eligible under the laws of the state of intended employment to practice as a registered nurse immediately upon admission to the U.S.

According to recent information provided by the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, H.R. 1933 remains on the Committee’s agenda, but is not yet scheduled for a Senate vote. As drafted, this legislation reauthorizes the availability of 300 H-1C visas (a departure from the 500 originally authorized under NRDAA) for an initial validity period of three years, with the opportunity to renew H-1C status for an additional three years. New aspects of H.R. 1933 include the three-year extension and H-1C portability between any of the eligible hospitals under INA §214(n). Whether H.R. 1933 becomes law remains to be determined, but it would no doubt assist authorized healthcare facilities to meet their nursing staff needs given that most H-1C visas have already expired.

Click here to view complete text for “Non-Immigrant Visa Options for Nurses”.

With Multiple Degrees and a Stable Job – Why Do They Still Leave?

I recently received an application from a Philippine-based RN ‘dreaming’ to work in US. The application packet, although complete and very professionally prepared, was sent through the applicant’s mother’s friend’s friend — infamously and laughably a common cultural practice in the Philippines that seeped its way into the modern workplace and overseas. Known as the ‘padrino system’ or patronage,  this is a system where one primarily gains favor through family affiliation  or friendship  before an applicant’s merit. 

The applicant is initially a BS Biology graduate of one of the best universities in the country, of which entries to both the system and the course program are cut-throat battles in the Philippine academe. Yet despite the laurels, the applicant immediately  went back to school after graduation and took up BS Nursing. Armed with this new degree, he simultaneously applied to reputable hospitals in Metro Manila while diligently preparing for the exam administered by the Texas Board of Nursing. Bright and determined, the applicant succeeded in both: got a much desired job in a famous modern hospital and passed the Texas Board exam for nurses in one take. Unfortunately for the applicant, the visa classification for RNs and professionals is on retrogression so US is definitely not in the applicant’s horizon. Unfortunately for the Philippines, if not the United States, there will be other Western countries that will employ him. Unfortunately for all the developing countries in the world such as former African colonies, Carribean Islands, East Germany, Soviet Union, India,  the case is not isolated in the Philippines. These countries’ brain drain is a brain gain to most highly developed North American, European and Asian countries.

For more info on retrogression, click here for our previous post.

This biologist turned RN wanting to work in US is a classic case of brain drain. Brain drain aka human capital flight is the not only the departure of educated or professional people from one country, it can also be from one economic sector, or field for another, usually for better pay or living conditions. Brain drain is often associated with de-skilling of emigrants in their country of destination, while their country of emigration experiences the draining of skilled individuals. Worse, a lot of these professionals emigrate to another country taking with them a fraction of value of their training sponsored by the government or other local organizations. They can’t be blamed though. They move to countries where their highly marketable skills are  financially rewarded.

Just to better illustrate the disparity in compensation, below is an official rate sheet of an RN working in an Upscale hospital in Metropolitan Manila.

The current market rate of an RN working in an Upscale hospital in Metropolitan Manila. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cut this by half or third, and that’s the approximate salary of RNs working in less prestigious hospitals. Some RNs don’t even get paid and many others pay the hospital in order to get work experience.

This is the salary equivalent in US dollars based on $43.00-Php 1.00 exchange rate. 

Salaries in converted to US dollars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

……

Illustrated below is the estimated annual compensation  of Med-Surg and CCU RNs in Metro New York as published by http://www.salary.com. A Med Surg nurse’s median annual salary is $76, 937 ($6,412/month) while a CCU nurse gets $ 77, 303 ($6,442/month) based on a 35-40 hour work week. 

.

Visa Retrogression – What does it mean to professional immigrant workers?

Before June of this year, there were two major visa categories that are popular among professional immigrant workers: the H1b Visa aka work visa and EB2 or the greencard route.

H1B visa is a non-immigrant visa that allows US employers to temporarily employ professional foreign workers in specialty occupations. On the other hand, EB2 Visa is a permanent residency route for professionals holding advanced degrees (Ph.D., master’s degree, or at least five years of progressive post-baccalaureate experience) or persons of exceptional ability in sciences, arts, or business.

Unfortunately, the USCIS has announced that the 2013 H-1B visa cap has been reached as of June 11th. Any cases received after June 11th will be rejected and returned with filing fees uncashed. However, the rejected and would-be applicants may file again next fiscal year. The next blow is that the July 2012 visa bulletin shows that the ‘worldwide EB2′ visa category has retrogressed almost 3 years. This is the one category that remained consistently ‘current’ in recent years (together with EB1).

What happens now?

Photo from http://redbus2us.com. Edited by author.

For more information about RETROGRESSION, click this link.

For USCIS Visa Bulletin, click here.

What does RETROGRESSION mean to professional immigrant workers and their employers? This could mean long waiting times for green cards.  This means job employment offers need to be rewritten or  projects be off-shored.  In uncertain cases such as this, not much can be done than to persevere and tuck growing disappointment. There are surely other legal routes to continue working in America while hoping that these two visas will be available again soon.

US immigration system is not ideal and reform is essential to ensure Uncle Sam does not lose talented people to help boost the economy and create jobs.Right now, all that is left to do is wait. Let us see what the future has in store.

SOURCE: http://www.uscis.gov

Disclaimer: This is a post written from a layman’s perspective and should not be regarded as an immigration advice.  For valid legal advice, consult an immigration lawyer.

Healthcare – Online Application Form

Talk to a job counselor about your career options. Simply fill out this form. Explore your options and develop your career plan for free!

You may also email your resume to jobs@meridiannurse.com