We Will Offer Whatever little we can…

Hurricane Sandy turned out to be more devastating than anyone had expected, leaving millions without power, destroying homes, causing flooding, and crippling transit throughout the tri-state area. Even though the storm is over, we at Meridian Nurse Recruiters hope that you are all safe, and we are inviting anyone to our office in Elmhurst, who may need a cup of hot coffee, a warm place to catch your breath, or a place to re-charge your electronic devices. Our door is open to you!

 

With Multiple Degrees and a Stable Job – Why Do They Still Leave?

I recently received an application from a Philippine-based RN ‘dreaming’ to work in US. The application packet, although complete and very professionally prepared, was sent through the applicant’s mother’s friend’s friend — infamously and laughably a common cultural practice in the Philippines that seeped its way into the modern workplace and overseas. Known as the ‘padrino system’ or patronage,  this is a system where one primarily gains favor through family affiliation  or friendship  before an applicant’s merit. 

The applicant is initially a BS Biology graduate of one of the best universities in the country, of which entries to both the system and the course program are cut-throat battles in the Philippine academe. Yet despite the laurels, the applicant immediately  went back to school after graduation and took up BS Nursing. Armed with this new degree, he simultaneously applied to reputable hospitals in Metro Manila while diligently preparing for the exam administered by the Texas Board of Nursing. Bright and determined, the applicant succeeded in both: got a much desired job in a famous modern hospital and passed the Texas Board exam for nurses in one take. Unfortunately for the applicant, the visa classification for RNs and professionals is on retrogression so US is definitely not in the applicant’s horizon. Unfortunately for the Philippines, if not the United States, there will be other Western countries that will employ him. Unfortunately for all the developing countries in the world such as former African colonies, Carribean Islands, East Germany, Soviet Union, India,  the case is not isolated in the Philippines. These countries’ brain drain is a brain gain to most highly developed North American, European and Asian countries.

For more info on retrogression, click here for our previous post.

This biologist turned RN wanting to work in US is a classic case of brain drain. Brain drain aka human capital flight is the not only the departure of educated or professional people from one country, it can also be from one economic sector, or field for another, usually for better pay or living conditions. Brain drain is often associated with de-skilling of emigrants in their country of destination, while their country of emigration experiences the draining of skilled individuals. Worse, a lot of these professionals emigrate to another country taking with them a fraction of value of their training sponsored by the government or other local organizations. They can’t be blamed though. They move to countries where their highly marketable skills are  financially rewarded.

Just to better illustrate the disparity in compensation, below is an official rate sheet of an RN working in an Upscale hospital in Metropolitan Manila.

The current market rate of an RN working in an Upscale hospital in Metropolitan Manila. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cut this by half or third, and that’s the approximate salary of RNs working in less prestigious hospitals. Some RNs don’t even get paid and many others pay the hospital in order to get work experience.

This is the salary equivalent in US dollars based on $43.00-Php 1.00 exchange rate. 

Salaries in converted to US dollars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

……

Illustrated below is the estimated annual compensation  of Med-Surg and CCU RNs in Metro New York as published by http://www.salary.com. A Med Surg nurse’s median annual salary is $76, 937 ($6,412/month) while a CCU nurse gets $ 77, 303 ($6,442/month) based on a 35-40 hour work week. 

.

Happy Father’s Day!

Switching Roles

The man’s name is Rommel. Rommel’s routine everyday included dropping and picking up 3 kids in school, and running errands, making the house tidy, preparing meals, doing the laundry  in between. His wife is a successful nurse practitioner who works full time in a large New York hospital and serves as consultant in several other healthcare facilities. She leaves at 7 am and goes home past 8 every night. After she parks the car in the house garage, the exhausted and work-weary wife turns to the TV until she falls asleep. Rommel, who just took out the dishes from the rack, then makes sure the children are ready for bed. With the children in slumber, he can then prepare the things he need to survive the following day before he goes to bed.

This is Rommel’s life. There are more husbands like him today. They are slowly redefining the word ‘father’. Roles are being switched by occupational demands and requirements, but fathers will always be fathers in our hearts.

Happy Father’s Day!

Becoming an Army Nurse Can be Rewarding

Considering an Army post as RN can indeed be very rewarding. Here’s an excerpt from an email a nurse in London sent me recently:

I have an Aunt who migrated from the Philippines when she was 21. Her first stop was as staff nurse at Mt. Sinai Hospital as a L & D nurse and later got offered to teach nursing courses at nearby Hunter College. She did both, teaching and nursing until one time, she got invited to a recruitment event that needed professional nurses to join their team of army nurse educators. Initially she said, she went there out of curiosity,  but after she learned more about the program, she came home a new person.

Forty years forward,  she retired as a Colonel who despite being civilian now still enjoys recognition in several organizations and worldwide events she attends without costing her anything. She has a centrally located apartment in Manhattan, 2 houses located in New Jersey and Seattle and a mansion in the Philippines. She travels 4 times a year paying almost nothing for airfare, gets discounts in a lot of stores, and gets superior medical and dental care in recognized hospitals in New York. The children’s tuition are fully paid off and the husband enjoys same healthcare benefits she has. Add to her list the sizable pension she receives … What a life!

Listed below are the benefits of enlisting in the Army as a healthcare professional. (Source:www.goarmy.com)

Health care professionals who serve as Officers in the U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) enjoy a wide range of opportunities and financial incentives. There are benefits, tangible and intangible, available to Officers who choose to serve full-time in the Army. These benefits are also conferred upon those who choose to serve when needed and maintain careers in their communities as part of the Army Reserve.

Active Army professionals are members of a multidisciplinary team focused on providing the best health care possible. Here, there aren’t any concerns about running a practice, hiring employees, processing insurance, purchasing equipment, stocking supplies or paying malpractice insurance.

You’ll also have opportunities to develop even more specialized skills than those you already have. From continuing education courses and seminars to clinical research and teaching, you’ll be able to enhance your level of expertise.

Plus, the U.S. Army offers scholarships and student loan repayment assistance to students and recent graduates in many health care fields.

You have many career options. Learn more about the benefits that come with serving your country.

via Benefits | GoArmy.com.